Sex Positive Me

E97: Unlearning Sex

Listen to “E97: Unlearning Sex” on Spreaker.

Unlearning Sex is a feature documentary film that follows Zanah’s six month journey through sexual trauma therapy and healing. In addition to audio clips from therapy, this film features interviews from trauma therapists, sex educators, and activists. Zanah’s goal with this film is for people to learn about sexual assault, trauma, and sex education, while watching someone heal in real time. In our conversation with Zanah she opened up about the making of this film and how it changed her life.

Unlearnign Sex Trailer: https://www.zanahthirus.com/unlearningsexdoc

Zanah Thirus, MS
Producer + Director
Zanah Thirus Productions, LLC
W: www.zanahthirus.com
E: zanahthirus@gmail.com

Zanah is an actress, producer, writer, and director from Chicago IL. After being homeschooled until she was fifteen years old, she began her college career. Her love for filmmaking sparked after years of acting in a drama team, and various independent films. She received her master’s degree in cinema production from DePaul University at the age of twenty two, and began her career in independent filmmaking and content production in 2015.

In 2016, Zanah won Best Female Director for her short film “Hourglass” at the Cineplay Film Awards. Her festival credits as a filmmaker include Official Selection – Chhatrapati Shivaji International Film Festival (2016), Best Student Documentary – London Independent Film Awards (2017), Semi Finalist at The German United Film Festival (2018), and Finalist at Cinema Los Angeles Film Festival (2018). In addition to her international credits, five of her films are streaming on Amazon Prime Video.

Since launching her brand, Zanah Thirus Productions LLC, Zanah has shifted her focus to merging arts and activism though documentary and narrative storytelling. Her films surround subjects such as gender, race, politics, and mental health. In 2019, her feature documentary- Black Feminist – was an official selection at the Bronze Lens Festival of Atlanta. That same year- her short film, Demons, was also nominated for Best Short Film at the Content Creators of Atlanta Awards. Shortly after her most decorated year, Zanah was named one of Diversity in Cannes Top 10 Filmmakers of the Decade.



Amberly Rothfield
on sex positive me explore all aspects of sex and relationships ranging from fetishes and BDSM to ethical non monogamy and LGBTQ issues. sex positive media stigmatizes sexual practices and relationships while reconciling reality with myths and misconceptions. Our goal is to educate, entertain and be advocates of sexual freedom. And now here’s your host Angelica john Luna.

Angelique
Hey everybody, this is Angelica Luna and I’m here with my quarantine stay at home husband tech guy trying to keep

John
trying to keep our sanity and not go off the edge so

Angelique
it’s okay john. Edge.

John
When you see me streaking through the neighborhood, you know it’s gone too far.

Angelique
We’re trying there. So we’re back on the on the rodeo doing podcast. Yay. And we have our first film this. Yeah

John
actress, producer, writer, director from your hometown.

Angelique
Yes, Chicago. That’s where I born and raised homo Portillo, so

you can tell what’s my favorite food but let and Zanna introduced herself. Did I do that? Right? Hi. Hey, it’s been a

discussion about this. I always do this. It’s

Zanah
totally fine. Usually a few times. It’s not a not a usual name. I also didn’t know you’re from Chicago.

Angelique
Yes. Yeah.

Yeah, sure. page. So yeah, I was all over that setting until 18. Then Mickey decided to kidnap me, and I’ve been here for 25 years. So anywhere you go, Florida. Yeah. So tell us about your background. And then yeah, to talking about the film.

Zanah
Awesome. Um, so I am. I’m Dana. I’m an independent filmmaker from Chicago, Illinois. I have produced six Film since 2015, I really, um, I guess I could say that I’m passionate about two things. And that is demystifying the micro budget film process, and then also creating activist centered work. So all of my films that I’ve produced, directed written, are created and produced on a micro budget scale. So the biggest budget I’ve had being $5,000, the smallest budget being $100. And a lot of my films center things like trauma and Sexual Assault Awareness, feminism, intersectionality, things of that nature. So I really love filmmaking, and I honestly can’t see myself doing anything else. I wear a lot of different hats as as people do in in the film world in the indie film world, but my favorite is production. I like the logistics of things My favorite is producing and specifically focusing on on Learning set. The my most recent feature Doc, this feature doc I wrote, produced, directed and edited. And it’s also my story. So I wear a lot of hats for this one.

John
But with a budget of $5,000 I can imagine your your post production pre production, a little bit of writing a little bit of lighting, so everything.

Zanah
Yeah, yeah, well, and this one $5,000 is like the most expensive film that I’ve that I’ve done. The biggest budget I’ve had this film from start to finish will be less than $2,000 Oh, wow.

Angelique
You get skills? Yeah.

Zanah
You learned to be nimble and scrappy when you’re an independent filmmaker research.

Angelique
Definitely. Yeah. Cuz, you know, here in Orlando, we used to have a lot in the film community before they decided to get rid of the tax break and then everyone went to Georgia. So I know. Thanks to like, cost. in production and film, but I’ve seen, you know, a little bit of the previews of the links that you send us on your films and you’ve done some great quality work there. And it’s fabulous. Thank

Zanah
you. Thank you so much.

Angelique
Yeah. So on learning sex, how come you came up with that title before we go into the meat of the subject?

Unknown Speaker
Yeah, so I am actually a part of a documentary Fellowship Program. From our template. Our template is a documentary of renowned documentary organization that focuses on social justice films, and yearly they have a program called diverse voices and dots where they take a cohort of diverse filmmakers and they workshop projects that they’re working on. And my project on learning effects originally was called a survivor story because it was following my journey through special trauma therapy. What I started sexual trauma therapy last summer and my therapy She specializes in narrative exposure therapy and she helps people heal not just through embodiment in different processes, but also finding a medium to help help them process trauma and pain. And a lot of people choose creative mediums. Me being a filmmaker, I chose film. And so I recorded the audio all of our therapy sessions, and I also recorded myself on camera before and after. And while doing like the therapy homework, just to track my progress, but also have a reference point. If I wanted to remember something my therapist said or, or whatever, as I was feeling triggered or having a lot of anxiety just to have something to go back to the tools that I needed and just have a way to reflect. And as I started rewatching and re listening, I realized how much I had changed over the course of six months and I how much I had grown and it was really We astonishing the way that I was coping and the person that I was, before I had faced my trauma and then during and then after the six month period, and so because of that, I compiled it. And after I compiled everything, I was like this needs to be more of a discussion. So that’s when I reached out to different organizations, therapists, educators, activists, and put together roundtable discussions to kind of create intercut in an interview format, as people will be able to watch my journey of three to six months of trauma therapy. So that’s how that all came about. And as I started compiling and editing, I realized that the name was not just about my story and survivor a really was about having to undo and having to unlearn and having to like restart and reset, especially because therapy had me go back to where the seed of this all started. And it really, a lot of times, it’s the framework in which we are taught, it’s the way that we exist in the world is it’s how we occupy our bodies, how we’re told to move throughout the world. And the things that we’re told to believe the things that we blame ourselves for, it was just so much unlearning that I had to do in order to heal. And that’s that’s kind of where, I guess throughout the Edit process and throughout the progression of creating this film, that’s how the name came about.

John
Well, first of all, kudos for sharing this. It’s such a private thing to go through therapy or such a trauma like that, and to go ahead and turn into a film and share with the world. Thank you so much. Well, also, we’ve gone through our daughter as a sex abuse survivor. And we’ve gone through the therapy. And again, a lot of people are very reluctant to go to therapy, but honestly, when you said it’s the first time I ever thought of actually recording it, because you know, now that she’s 19 and grown up, there’s so many things I would have love to have remembered, or, you know, in still difficult times, because for some it’s never it’s an it’s a healing process that almost never ends every so often you go back.

Zanah
And you know, one of the things that that we we address in the film is how trauma manifests differently for everybody. And it is a very personal thing where some people may have that initial response and then other people, you know, it may be it may show up in their lives in different ways throughout the course of their life. And I’m one of those people that you know, it is an ongoing thing. And so for me recording and having a reference point, something to go back to was very helpful. And a lot of people are very apprehensive to go to therapy because they don’t know what it’s like. I think the media portrays a really unrealistic kind of visual or or I’m blanking on the word I’m looking for, but they they set an unrealistic expectation as to what to expect from therapy. A lot of time.

And I really close eyes.

Angelique
Yeah, it was it’s very stigmatized because I was actually one of the first and only parents to tell the child advocacy office that, hey, I want to get my daughter into therapy right away. And they all looked at me like, you know why and like, because I’ve gone through a trauma. Well, once we started going through the program, yes, I was the only pro advocate of mental health and every parent grandparent relative said, No, we don’t want to do therapy. We don’t I’m like you’re doing a disservice to your child, why blu ray, and you’re doing a disservice to yourself. And just the amount of stigma around the mental health let alone the, you know, sexual abuse was insane, because that’s one thing. I’ve always been like an advocate so I never know which one I’m on the black sheep because I’m an advocate for mental health or an advocate for sex itself. Hmm, which one’s the lesser of the two evils? So yeah,

Zanah
it’s hard. It’s it’s a difficult topic, it’s definitely stigmatized and and people don’t really understand it, or the benefit of it, or why why people do go to therapy and the different types of therapy and the things that are addressed in therapy. And it’s a whole world that we, we talk a lot about, we don’t necessarily, oftentimes don’t get to see someone through the healing process and what that can look like not saying that everyone’s healing journey is the same. But one of the main reasons why I chose to do this was for it to be a resource for survivors to understand that this is a path that they can take that that this is why therapy is necessary. And this is what this can look like.

Angelique
Absolutely, though, I mean, we try to also explain to people that there’s several different ways to having therapy and then also that sometimes alternative relationships like the BDSM kink community can be therapeutic and healing if it’s done properly with, you know, counselors and therapists, you know, to communicate and process their feelings. And sometimes people don’t understand even within the mental health therapy, there’s several different types between emotional, psychological, I mean, the whole list went down of like options there to find therapists and people. It’s like, trying to find the right therapist is trying to find the right shoe you got to try a couple on before you find the perfect fit.

Zanah
Absolutely, absolutely. 1,000%.

John
Well, I got to see the the trailer you put together I know, you’re still in post production for the film. But I loved when you asked two people. What’s the problem with sex ed? And the response was missing from sex ed. And the response was, well, the sex part. Yeah.

Zanah
That’s so true. It’s so true the film is 120 minutes long, and we have six different chapters. So we start off with defining what is a sexual assault and what is trauma and what is a defining what is sexual assault, and then we go into what is sexual trauma. The third chapter is misconceptions surrounding sexual assault and trauma, then we go into consent, then intersectionality. And the final chapter is sex education and sex positive parenting. And me asking the what is missing from sex ed is the first part of that chapter of the film. And it’s really it’s very, very interesting to me that, you know, there’s so much talk about what to avoid what could go wrong. And there’s there’s very little knowledge beyond just, you know, biological, like reproductive based teaching affects, there’s not we don’t have comprehensive sex education. We rarely have that anywhere. And these conversations, you To be happening from a very young age. And it’s something that is widely accepted abstinence only sex, sex ed, abstinence driven sex ed fear tactics, like those are things that are usually incorporated within sex ed. And if it doesn’t, it doesn’t help anybody.

John
Well, the amount of people we encounter that still have such guilt around not just sex, but pleasure in general, just because of the way they were talked about it as a child, they bring it into adulthood and bring it into their relationships and, and their marriages. And there is there’s so few resources even at that point, to go ahead and resolve it. Because again, if you look for I need sex would help the first person, you know that they’re immediately start thinking, Oh, the adult industry, it’s like, no, they’re there. We’re not talking sex as in biology. We all know how that part works is intimacy. And yeah, That is what is missing. Not just not just for again, kids and thankfully there are much more resources for sex positive parents to teach their kids, but we’re finding adults for in their 40s and 50s that are turning around going I you know, I’ve never talked about this. And it’s amazing.

Zanah
It’s definitely a pleasure is another huge topic that we cover in this film because I, I am a survivor where I, throughout the filming journey, it is journals, five different assaults. And one of them involving pleasure and me not being aware that it was an assault. And one of the homework assignments from my my therapist was for me to actually start masturbating again. Because I needed to rediscover my body and give consent to my body but also start reshaping, neurologically, physically, emotionally, what pleasure was for myself. giving myself consent to have pleasure in a safe space in a space that I can send it to. And I did not realize that I did not I was unaware of what had happened to me being an assault, because there was pleasure involved. And a lot of times that brings out a lot of guilt for survivors, you know, if this was bad, why would I feel this way? Or, and this is why I can’t tell anybody about it, things of that nature. And also, we talked about in the sex education chapter, when we talk about pleasure. We speak one of the sex educators. His name is siete. He talks about how when he talks to boys about about sex, a lot of times pleasure even for them is still left out of the conversation. And if we start teaching pleasure as a part of the conversation that also can intertwine consent, we also can be cognizant of what our partners feelings are, what feels good to them because we’re focusing on what feels good to what feels good to them? It makes for healthier experiences all together, and not demonizing that, because teaching kids that, that pleasure is not okay at all is just as detrimental as the overexposure. You know, it’s it’s something that is a huge topic in the film, and I’m so glad that it is because it’s just, it’s missing. It’s missing from psychoeducation.

Angelique
Absolutely, it’s very important to have that because I think people are afraid or just don’t know how to talk about it. I know when we teach a couple parents how to talk to your kids about sex at age appropriate sex education. Some of them just turn around and says, Can we just pay you and teach our kids I’m like, No, I’m going to try to

tell them straight up I’ll fix you. You came in to fix you so that way you’re the resource and they keep coming to you. You don’t need to me

Zanah
and eliminating the shame. You know, the shame that’s around just sex in general but but intimacy but pleasure, facts, all of that, like there should be it’s just a part of life. I think it should be spoken about that of course, there’s age congruent sex talks, we talked about that in the film that it’s not really age appropriate because there’s not an inappropriate way to talk about you know, pleasurable sex, healthy sex, those things, but there is age congruent sex talks that you can have with your kids, depending on where they are, you know, it’s talking to you, your child about consent, and reproduction and sex and things like that it’s going to look different when they’re seven as to when they’re 17. So there’s, of course, different ways to have those conversations, but it shouldn’t be an awkward topic in your house is something that is open, go ahead, go please keep going. I was just gonna say it should be something that’s, that’s open. That’s welcome. Because having that open line of communication is what’s going to build trust. And, and that’s, that’s another way to further protect your kids sheltering them. You know, I grew up in a very strict religious, Christian household, and we were sheltered from a lot of things. We were naive to a lot of things. And that backfired because what my parents thought they were doing was protecting us. But internally, it would be opposite because we were kind of thrown to the wolves. And and it’s just important to start having those conversations very, very early.

John
Well, one thing I wanted to touch on is there’s definitely the social shame for the sex, the intimacy and the pleasure. And over the last few years, what I’ve realized is when I talk with coaching clients, they’ll say stuff like Well, I was in even something as simple as I went and got a pedicure, and it was a long week, I deserved it. And what I realized was, every time someone did something as simple as you know, going for a massage, or taking the weekend off and going to the beach, it was immediately followed up with an excuse on why it was okay for them to do it. As opposed to just saying, God damn it, I’m an adult. I’m going on a vacation. I’m doing this without a justification, just to enjoy the pleasures

Angelique
of it. You know, whatever it is Leo, as we like to say guilty pleasures of eating that chocolate chip cookie when you’re on a diet and it’s your carb day, you know? Yeah.

We’re gonna take a short little break and listen to our sponsors who are being nice to a stern as, you know, quarantine time and still taking care of us and we’ll be right back with more talking about on learning sex. Hey, john, I want to get a new toy.

John
Okay, so let’s go to fair villa.

Angelique
But I want to waste time trying to find out what goes with what?

John
Well, there’s Fairfield University and their staff is very well educated and helpful.

Angelique
Okay, but how about if I just wanted a job party instead?

John
Then go to their website because on their calendar, they list all their events,

Angelique
but I don’t want to spend a lot of money.

John
Have you heard of their loyalty program?

Angelique
Oh, yeah, that thing. I’m like a chain that makes everyone blush every time they see it.

John
That’s the one. Let’s go. Well, they have over five locations in Central Florida. Which one do you want to go to?

Angelique
for pleasure, fun, fantasy.

So this is how much fun we have on a podcast. I love our audience and my crazy rants.

It’s a tough subject that we’re talking about. But the information that is in this movie is priceless. Well, so healing and needed

John
it definitely needed. Because we’ve gone through this personally, through her daughter’s experiences, and what we what we saw and this was going back 10 years, little over 10 years when we found out how little resources there were. So the fact that it’s being put into a movie and and showing what therapy can do because most people think therapy is just a band aid. Oh, you can just deal with it yourself. And it’s not. We wouldn’t go ahead and say hey, you have Corona, go home and make some tea and get over it. But we do that so much with anything. associated with with mental illness or trauma works at one of the things we were bringing up was about talking about your kids is such a uncomfortable subject when it comes to sex. But in reality, we make it that uncomfortable we being parents, because we get so nervous at it. And it’s really, I think it’s one of those hereditary things because my parents, I’m sure, I know, they had a very uncomfortable conversation with me, and their parents probably had a very uncomfortable conversation with her. Thankfully, mine with my child was a little bit more.

Angelique
Yeah, no, we definitely were more much, much better with our child because we kind of made sure we normalize the conversation about sex and sex education. We did not hide anything. We did do comprehensive sex education ourselves with our daughter, which ended up getting us in trouble with other parents because their kids ended up coming over and asking questions and getting resources. So it’s like Hey Mr. Mrs. Luna, can we get some condoms and boobs? And I’m like, Just don’t tell ya, that’s where you got this or, you know, answering all these questions. So yeah, we were like those bad instigators, but yeah, we are both born and raised Catholic, John’s Italian I’m Mexican. So I am first generation born here. So you can imagine the conversations and the beat downs with like, don’t have sex with boys don’t be with boys. And I’m just like Natalie. And it’s like, lo and behold, I had older friends and learn things that they will never want to know.

Zanah
Yeah, and you know, and that’s something that I think is so overlooked it for me, I, me and my siblings. Were all homeschooled until we went to college and we went to college when we were 14 years old. And so we were thrown into an adult environment very early, and I have put my mom in the dock in the first first chapter. I talked to both my mom and dad, my mom, I she said that she would not, she didn’t need to talk to us about sex because boys were supposed to be your friend at that age, you know, they weren’t supposed to be interested in a romantic partnership or intimacy, you’re being intimate with a man at 14. But what you fail to realize was that, you know, throwing us into an adult environment, very naive, very trusting, very unaware. That that completely backfired because we were surrounded by people, especially at a community college where you have people that could be up to twice your age, being 14 years old. That was That was dangerous. That was really scary. And it was very easy to be taken advantage of. And I you know, looking back I wish that I had more comprehensive but also just real, honest conversations. And it wasn’t looked at as like you’re too young to notice. Because so many times children are surrounded by their peers, but you don’t know who else they’re going to be going to be around what other information that they’re going to be getting from where. And creating a space where it’s like, you don’t need to know these things because you’re a child and sheltering your children from that is, it’s the recipe for disaster. And that’s exactly what happened to me.

John
A lot of parents don’t mean to do it, and they do believe they’re protecting their child. But the misinformation turns them into victims because there are predators out there. And we need more kids need to know more than just sex is bad run the other way,

Angelique
but also they need to know the proper medical terms for their body and anatomy.

John
So that way they can express it in case anything does happen

Angelique
right now. Absolutely. Flour peepee I just drove right saying how many parents just feel very awkward. Bye. saying the biological scientific name of the anatomy, literally.

Zanah
Yeah. Yeah, absolutely. Absolutely. We talk about that in the film as well. And I, a, it’s, it’s a whole, it’s a whole topic meet with some of the sex educators I talked to one of them said that they had dealt with sex educators who literally did not want to say the word vagina. And they were like teaching at a school. And we’re uncomfortable actually saying the word. And it’s just it’s mind blowing to me, like how every condition is so digitized and how everything is looked at is so just just wrong. So, so dirty. So just like we literally paint sex with something that is so bad for children and then expect them to be able to have these healthy, flourishing like consensual relationships with people It is mind blowing.

Angelique
Well, let me tell you how even more disturbing it is because my daughter sex abuse was caught on film by the local county sheriff. So when we finally got to talk with the district attorney about the case, you know, the district attorney started asking my daughter questions. It’s like, Did he touch your flower? Did you touch your butterfly and me and my daughter looked at each other? What are you talking about? And then we both Dinah and the state attorney, it was just like, what, what? And like, Yeah, she knows it’s a vagina. Yeah, it’s a vagina right there. And yeah, yeah. Unfortunately, her abuse was actually loving, because it was from her paternal grandfather. So even though she knew the body parts, it was very nurturing and loving the sex abuse. Um, so Wow. Like I said, even like, you know, the government office using those terms instead of saying the word straight up. was like, oh god, this is how fucked up our society is. That is.

Zanah
That is crazy. Like the government, like why I like I have no word.

John
Wow. Wow. You know, having because you mentioned the sex ed teacher who couldn’t say the word vagina my mind immediately said that’s like having a gym coach that is afraid of balls. I mean, yeah. Do you do your job? If you

Zanah
literally if you do, how do you do your job?

Angelique
I need to get by.

Zanah
Yeah, like we Well the thing is also we talked about this like, statewide, they they have like comprehensive sex education and things that are given to school but it’s to schools, but it’s, it’s up to whoever is teaching the class how they want to share it. And a lot of times, schools don’t have a designated sex ed teacher. A lot of times it’s like also the house teacher or the gym teacher or who They have also teaching sex ed. And we talked about the importance of actually having somebody in the school who that is their job. And why that is so needed. Oh, yeah, it’s

so many topics.

John
I would love to see that on a budget for a school district. Just even if, even if there was like one per county and some of these counties will have 100 schools in them. That’s still better than what we have these days. Yeah, right. Man, well, I know what the film on learning sex that you went over your therapy, but at the end of therapy, one of the most important thing that does come out of that is healing. So you said there was a huge difference from when you started to when you ended, if you don’t mind share that with us.

Zanah
So basically, this film like details in addition to roundtable interviews with therapists and activists and educators a detailed my six month journey through sexual trauma therapy. And the first assignment that I had for my therapists and what I did to pretty much prep for this, the upcoming therapy session was to write a document of every situation where I had been assaulted or violated. And there were five different assaults. And that was very, that was very, very hard for me to do. It took me a couple of days to do it, because I had to keep stepping away. And then what my therapist did was each therapy session over the course of six months, we went over that document and she would highlights and color code, different things in the narrative. And she would help me identify things like shame and blame and guilt and help me rephrase my language so that I understood you know, Why I reacted the way that I reacted and helping me navigate trauma and understanding that, you know, a lot of the the responses that I had to these traumas, these traumatic situations through these assaults is actually normal. She helped me identify that I had a trauma response to pleasure and and how to navigate that and how to work through that. And over the course of six months, at the end of that she had me rewrite that document with the tools that I have now. And it was, it was astonishing to see that difference. I have a time lapse recording of me writing the first document and she also had me write a letter to my 16 year old self forgiving her for or relinquishing a lot of the blame that I had toward her for her negativity, because I did blame myself for for not knowing for being so trusting of people that wound up hurting me, and I have time lapse recordings of myself writing these letters at the beginning of therapy, and then six months later, and the first videos, I’m like, sobbing the whole time and having to take breaks and as at the end of it all, and after the six months period, going through that those same exercises and rewriting those documents and rewriting the letter, it was such a difference. I was breathing different. I was writing different I was getting through without shedding a tear, just because of the knowledge that I had just because of the language that I had and what I understood about myself, and it was, that’s really what prompted me to be like, Okay, this could really help somebody because I was shocked seeing what a difference. Trauma therapy had made. In me coping and working through my trauma.

Angelique
Now question, have you been to just regular therapy, not trauma therapy because there is a difference between the two?

Zanah
There is I did I did when I was 19. I started, I went to therapy. And it was I finally I opened up to my mom and finally told her I was in therapy and her only response was, is it a Christian therapist? Oh, my God. Yeah. That was that was, that did not end well. But that was the first time that I went to therapy. And it was really, that was the first time that I sat down and was able to express to somebody how I was feeling but I was not aware that I was dealing with sexual trauma. Because again, the framework of understanding of what sex and intimacy was, was still very new to me. And It was also for me, getting to the root of it all. And being with a therapist that you trust is really important. I just went to my school’s Therapy Center, they had a mental health center and students could, throughout the course of their college career, take 20 sessions for free. And so it was like whoever is like available, and you know, you just go. But this was something that with trauma therapy with special trauma therapy, it was something that was very specialized. I researched my therapist, I found a Therapy Center that I trusted, and I found somebody that I really wanted to work with because of the work that they did with narrative exposure therapy. And with her being a black woman, a black queer woman, who just was very, she embodies intersectionality and was very affirming in that way. So so that was, it was a huge difference from just going to General therapy and going through therapy that was specific to sexual trauma therapy.

John
Well, I’m glad you were able to find, again, a therapist who speaks to you a lot of people don’t think of that like a therapist as a therapist, but when you think about it, it’s like, how many doctors have you been to or kind of left? Because they had a certain, I don’t know, a way of doing medicine or maybe dismissed your complaints that you didn’t like. So you may have gone through many MDS, why not go through multiple mental health therapists because you need to find someone who speaks to you. And unfortunately out there because we’ve looked for therapists and I have nothing against older white women, but there is a lot of them that are older white women, and it’s hard for Southern speaking for someone else here. It’s hard for minorities and and queer people to find a therapist that speaks to them when they’re speaking to someone who’s not living a life life.

Angelique
Or have experienced any of like the discriminations or anything because I’m like, Mexican and bisexual here and like going through five different therapists to just find the right therapist was very frustrated. It was just like, a break. I know what my sexual identity is. I know what my boundaries aren’t, that’s not helping me heal the loss of my daughter’s innocence. So right work with me here. Yeah.

Zanah
Absolutely. Absolutely.

John
Well, I want to say thank you very much for taking time and talking to us during this quarantine session. Yeah. But I’m on learning sex is the name of the title. What, when is it going to be released and where can people look for it

Angelique
and find you?

Zanah
Yes. So we are right now in post production for the full film slated to be done by the end of the month at the latest mid May. And that’s when we’re starting to submit it to social justice oriented festivals and documentary film festivals. The goal with this film is actually to take it on a trauma awareness tour. And given the state of the world right now, that’s not going to happen this year, but for Sexual Assault Awareness Month, next year in 2021, we’re hoping to be able to do that. I am still figuring out exactly where the film is going to live. Because it’s something that is a very sensitive subject it also it can be very triggering to people. So I want to make sure that I’m sharing it in in safe spaces. But it is going to be hitting the festival circuit this year. And people can follow me on Instagram. It’s just my first name, underscore underscore, the a and ah, and I’ll be posting updates about the film from there.

John
We’re looking We’re looking forward to the release. And we’ll push the dates up when they become available. But I know you’ve done a lot of films, but this is this is obviously a personal one for you. So yeah, this is your baby.

Zanah
And this is her soul,

Angelique
her baby, this is our soul because that’s

about your therapy and your healing and your journey. Yeah, that’s a whole different level.

Zanah
Yeah, if this was the most vulnerable, that I’ve had to ever be with any project that I’ve that I’ve done, and I just, I want to make sure that the spaces that that it is that I shared in our very supportive spaces and working with organizations to share it with their audiences, even if that’s virtually or if they have a platform where their their audiences can find it. We’re still working out as far as distribution goes exactly, but the if you follow me on Instagram, the TV Is there and you’ll see a three, three minutes of footage from the film.

Angelique
Sounds great. Well, thank you very much everyone. Don’t forget to like, subscribe and follow us everywhere on social media. We’re trying to be very non humorous on our little quarantines.

John
Oh no, we’re always humorous. Don’t even you can’t approach a subject as sensitive like this and sex with a stiff upper lip. You gotta go ahead humorous part of life. You just gotta go with it. Yeah.

Angelique
Talk to you soon. Have a good night.

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